Daily use of the fandom may melt your brain
sumeragidesu:

darkest-symphony:

shehasamind:

unknownusername:

twisted:

uakari20:

bottan:

uakari20:

twicebornbacchus:


”If nobody ever killed anyone,then why would we lose sight of the most important things?”

I know this sentence is supposed to be the key to understanding what wish Kamui finally makes, but I have no idea what the hell it means. I don’t mean in a philosophical sense, either.

THANK GOD I AM NOT THE ONLY ONE.
This page has irked me for ages.  Because WHAT. WHAT DOES IT MEAN????

Where do I find this page in the manga? /plans on looking it up in German, if nothing else!

This is Vol 18.5 (or 19 - it’s the unfinished volume that got published as a freebie in  some version of 18), ch 5, pg 16.
Fuuma also says almost the exact same thing on Vol 18, ch 5, pg 17.
YOU ARE AWESOME ~<3

Nope. This is still volume 18, its last chapter. In Polish edition it says “If you shouldn’t kill anyone, then why nobody notices the most important thing?”
And neither Karen nor Kamui were sure what did Fuuma mean by that.

The original Japanese is:
「誰も誰かを殺してはいけないなら どうして見失ってしまうんでしょうね 大事なことを」
Which is one of those sentences which is difficult to translate without better context.  The first part is more or less like… ‘If nobody’s allowed to kill anyone’ or ‘If it’s wrong for anybody to kill anyone else’ or… something along those lines.  Then the second bit is ‘Why do we lose sight of what’s important?’
& this is just a theory, but I think what Fuuma’s getting at here is ‘If killing other humans is so immoral, then why do so many people lose sight of their own will to live?’  Which also links back to ideas that are explored in xxxHolic.
Basically that the more you treasure someone, the more important they are to you, & the more you love them, the more you lose sight of your own importance to that person.  It crops up a lot in X: the idea that sacrificing your own life for someone else’s sake isn’t as noble a gesture as it may appear, because the person you left behind will grieve for you.
I was talking about this with my Japanese teacher a while back, & she explained that often in Japanese culture, even now, there are certain circumstances in which death is considered the ‘correct’ or the ‘noble’ option to take, which in her opinion stems back to the historical prevalence of things like ritualistic suicide.  She cited a relatively recent case of a politician who’d been involved in some kind of scandal who then killed himself, & how that was perceived by many as being an appropriate or proportionate course of action.
& I think, given a lot of Fuuma’s remarks & some of the plot developments in the story (I’m gonna assume you all know what I’m talking about here, if not I can cite references later), that X is ultimately going to be a deconstruction or critique of that particular mindset.  We see various characters sacrifice themselves for people they care about, & undoubtedly more will die this way should the story resume, & in each case the characters that are left behind mourn their deaths.  So as readers we’re put in a position where we empathise with that sense of loss, where we can see that in many cases the sacrifice was a futile gesture, & that it’d likely have been better for that character to try to save themselves as well as the people they love then live together.
So I think Fuuma’s role in this is to challenge & test humanity’s will to live.  If humanity, as a whole, has a strong enough will to survive then it will.  If it doesn’t, the earth will be reclaimed by nature.  & I probably need to re-read to make sure that this all adds up, but I think Fuuma’s wish is for Kamui to live.  If Kamui’s wish ultimately ends up being to die, Fuuma would want to be the one to kill him (see: the conversation between Fuuma & Kakyou after Seishirou’s death), but at the moment he’s testing Kamui, trying to goad him into finding that resolve.
Or… something…  Jesus fuck what I am even talking about anymore…p

this person got it so well, I want to cry. Oh lord. 

Oh my God. It’s beautiful. IT ALL FITS TOGETHER. THANK YOU.

To jump in on this theory, because twindestinies and I had more or less surmised similarly the meaning of Fuuma’s words here, and I think this ties well with the whole concept of noble sacrifice, I had a theory about Kamui’s inability to create kekkai.
It’s never explicitly stated what the exact criteria for creating a kekkai are, only that it’s borne from the desire to protect. However, this has caused Kamui some grief, as we see that despite his desire to protect (Fuuma specifically, in this case) he is still unable to create one. I have a guess that simply the desire to protect is not enough, but specifically the desire to protect something in the sense that you would be willing to sacrifice your life for it. I am unsure if it’s explicitly stated who the other Dragons of Heaven think of when they create a kekkai (I’m sure it is, but you’ll forgive me as I am unaware of the mentions) but this is at least consistent with Subaru, whose Wish is literally to die by the hand of the person he wants to protect, and Sorata, who has spent his entire life expecting that he’d die for a beautiful woman. I think it’s also safe to guess that in some capacity, most of the Dragons of Heaven would be willing to give of their lives for the cause of protecting humanity.
However, Kamui is an exception. Kamui hasn’t been shown as someone who believes in what’s fleeting or won’t last. We see this in his flashback side-story with Fuuma, where he’s hesitant to bring the puppy home with him because he points out that the memory of a warm home would only cause him grief when it inevitably ends. So I believe that when he says his Wish is to bring Fuuma back, just returning him to normal wouldn’t be enough for him. He wants to experience his friendship with Fuuma again. He wants to be there to see it happen, because he’s selfish. And in that sense, he’s not willing to give up his life for it. He wants to live.
And I have a theory, that that’s Kamui’s True Wish. To live. Which is, of course, something he’d have to realize on his own, and would be an appropriate thing for him to realize just as Fuuma’s about to run him through with the Holy Sword and he’s remembering Karen’s (and Fuuma’s) words here.

sumeragidesu:

darkest-symphony:

shehasamind:

unknownusername:

twisted:

uakari20:

bottan:

uakari20:

twicebornbacchus:

”If nobody ever killed anyone,then why would we lose sight of the most important things?”

I know this sentence is supposed to be the key to understanding what wish Kamui finally makes, but I have no idea what the hell it means. I don’t mean in a philosophical sense, either.

THANK GOD I AM NOT THE ONLY ONE.

This page has irked me for ages.  Because WHAT. WHAT DOES IT MEAN????

Where do I find this page in the manga? /plans on looking it up in German, if nothing else!

This is Vol 18.5 (or 19 - it’s the unfinished volume that got published as a freebie in  some version of 18), ch 5, pg 16.

Fuuma also says almost the exact same thing on Vol 18, ch 5, pg 17.

YOU ARE AWESOME ~<3

Nope. This is still volume 18, its last chapter. In Polish edition it says “If you shouldn’t kill anyone, then why nobody notices the most important thing?”

And neither Karen nor Kamui were sure what did Fuuma mean by that.

The original Japanese is:

「誰も誰かを殺してはいけないなら どうして見失ってしまうんでしょうね 大事なことを」

Which is one of those sentences which is difficult to translate without better context.  The first part is more or less like… ‘If nobody’s allowed to kill anyone’ or ‘If it’s wrong for anybody to kill anyone else’ or… something along those lines.  Then the second bit is ‘Why do we lose sight of what’s important?’

& this is just a theory, but I think what Fuuma’s getting at here is ‘If killing other humans is so immoral, then why do so many people lose sight of their own will to live?’  Which also links back to ideas that are explored in xxxHolic.

Basically that the more you treasure someone, the more important they are to you, & the more you love them, the more you lose sight of your own importance to that person.  It crops up a lot in X: the idea that sacrificing your own life for someone else’s sake isn’t as noble a gesture as it may appear, because the person you left behind will grieve for you.

I was talking about this with my Japanese teacher a while back, & she explained that often in Japanese culture, even now, there are certain circumstances in which death is considered the ‘correct’ or the ‘noble’ option to take, which in her opinion stems back to the historical prevalence of things like ritualistic suicide.  She cited a relatively recent case of a politician who’d been involved in some kind of scandal who then killed himself, & how that was perceived by many as being an appropriate or proportionate course of action.

& I think, given a lot of Fuuma’s remarks & some of the plot developments in the story (I’m gonna assume you all know what I’m talking about here, if not I can cite references later), that X is ultimately going to be a deconstruction or critique of that particular mindset.  We see various characters sacrifice themselves for people they care about, & undoubtedly more will die this way should the story resume, & in each case the characters that are left behind mourn their deaths.  So as readers we’re put in a position where we empathise with that sense of loss, where we can see that in many cases the sacrifice was a futile gesture, & that it’d likely have been better for that character to try to save themselves as well as the people they love then live together.

So I think Fuuma’s role in this is to challenge & test humanity’s will to live.  If humanity, as a whole, has a strong enough will to survive then it will.  If it doesn’t, the earth will be reclaimed by nature.  & I probably need to re-read to make sure that this all adds up, but I think Fuuma’s wish is for Kamui to live.  If Kamui’s wish ultimately ends up being to die, Fuuma would want to be the one to kill him (see: the conversation between Fuuma & Kakyou after Seishirou’s death), but at the moment he’s testing Kamui, trying to goad him into finding that resolve.

Or… something…  Jesus fuck what I am even talking about anymore…p

this person got it so well, I want to cry. Oh lord. 

Oh my God. It’s beautiful. IT ALL FITS TOGETHER. THANK YOU.

To jump in on this theory, because twindestinies and I had more or less surmised similarly the meaning of Fuuma’s words here, and I think this ties well with the whole concept of noble sacrifice, I had a theory about Kamui’s inability to create kekkai.

It’s never explicitly stated what the exact criteria for creating a kekkai are, only that it’s borne from the desire to protect. However, this has caused Kamui some grief, as we see that despite his desire to protect (Fuuma specifically, in this case) he is still unable to create one. I have a guess that simply the desire to protect is not enough, but specifically the desire to protect something in the sense that you would be willing to sacrifice your life for it. I am unsure if it’s explicitly stated who the other Dragons of Heaven think of when they create a kekkai (I’m sure it is, but you’ll forgive me as I am unaware of the mentions) but this is at least consistent with Subaru, whose Wish is literally to die by the hand of the person he wants to protect, and Sorata, who has spent his entire life expecting that he’d die for a beautiful woman. I think it’s also safe to guess that in some capacity, most of the Dragons of Heaven would be willing to give of their lives for the cause of protecting humanity.

However, Kamui is an exception. Kamui hasn’t been shown as someone who believes in what’s fleeting or won’t last. We see this in his flashback side-story with Fuuma, where he’s hesitant to bring the puppy home with him because he points out that the memory of a warm home would only cause him grief when it inevitably ends. So I believe that when he says his Wish is to bring Fuuma back, just returning him to normal wouldn’t be enough for him. He wants to experience his friendship with Fuuma again. He wants to be there to see it happen, because he’s selfish. And in that sense, he’s not willing to give up his life for it. He wants to live.

And I have a theory, that that’s Kamui’s True Wish. To live. Which is, of course, something he’d have to realize on his own, and would be an appropriate thing for him to realize just as Fuuma’s about to run him through with the Holy Sword and he’s remembering Karen’s (and Fuuma’s) words here.

A lesson learnt from xxxHolic

littlemissenigma:

imageimageimage

and the only way to save yourself from being bound by words, is to change yourself.

image

"I can’t".

"It’s impossible".

If you say those words, or allow others to say them to you, it’s so easy to fail.

- Yuko Ichihara, xxxHolic


petshophorrors:
Dan gyokuei’s Profile

Okay why the heck is tumblr reblogging things on its own

genesis-of-supernova:

Kimihiro Watanuki: The brave

tonystarks:

don’t imagine your otp slow dancing in their socks while the taller of the two hums a tune (terribly) for them to dance to and the shorter has their face pressed into the taller one’s shoulder. don’t imagine it.

subtlevariationsofblues:

what do you mean that’s not what he says

fist-of-shipping:

beautiful

fist-of-shipping:

beautiful